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Posts Tagged ‘neck pickup’

Volume Pedal for steel-like swells

August 26th, 2012

Quote:
  _____  

Originally Posted by porgy (Post 1657592)
I was thinking about volume sustain and a vibrato thing. I saw a Danny Gaton, not sure how his name is spelt, video instruction tape, in fact I own it, but he was showing how to rotate the volume control or pod, with one of your playing hands to get a volume pedal effect. I kind of like that idea, does anyone here know if they make something you can hook to your volume knob on the tele, to get that effect without giving up the playing action of your hand and having to use a volume pedal. On another note, how does or did Roy Buchanan get that haunting vibrato sound on his playing style. Signing off.
  _____  

To do volume swells with your pinky on a Tele you pretty much have to turn the control plate around, swap the volume and tone pots, and then turn the switch around the other way so that it points in the direction of the neck pickup when switched to neck, etc. This puts the volume pot where the switch used to be, and you can get your pinky around it. It takes some practice, but you can do that Roy Buchanan thing without a volume pedal.

John


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Hello TDPRI

April 23rd, 2012

Hello TDPRI. I have been lurking here for a long time, getting help from all of your reviews, tips, rants etc. I am a fender nut and have a Telecaster and just finally decided to make an account and put a face on this lurker. THANKS for all of the tips, reviews etc. up to now BTW.

So me, I started playing Fenders in the early 80s, when I got a Bullet (81) and a Deluxe reverb amp as a gift (from musical family members). I learned on that setup and played around in a few little punk bands in those early days, and got a few more guitars (a thinline, and then a G&L ASAT (that one with the P90 looking pickups) and an icky non-fender thing. But, life was getting in the way at some point then and I decided to pack it in, and I got rid of all my stuff >_<

Well fastforward 20 years, and school is done, career going ok, Wife and Baby, and it seemed like a good time to get back in. So I hunt down and bought an 81 bullet (in awesome condition) as I missed that thing, and ended up getting a MIM Telecaster to throw in my bag take on my bike etc. as well (kind of like a beater bike). Only thing is, that MIM tele (it is a mid 90s Toploader) is darn nice. Almost everything about it is good. I was not crazy about the pickups but that was it. Now I have put in a strat neck pickup from a 50 RI model (will I be thrown out of the forum for that?) and a Duncan (STL-1 I think) both used from the Bay and pretty cheap. Now, man, it sounds as good as my US made bullet. The Bullet actually has a kind of Telecaster bridge sound and a Strat neck sound, so that was the reason for the mod to the Telecaster I think.

I got a lot of tips from you guys about the wiring in the Tele when doing my mods actually.

Oh, I had no amp left either and just picked up a Super Champ XD for around the house, though still pining for a deluxe reverb. Someday. Loving the SCXD!!!! BTW.

So, I am playing again and I started taking lessons from local working musician/teacher and am really enjoying the guitar. Signed up for this list, as I like reading the Guitar talk, and I like Fender guitars.

Anyway, that is me and my gear. I have some photos of most of that up in my photos here already.

j


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Gordon-Smith GS2 60

November 2nd, 2011

It’s a funny old world, isn’t it? Gibson puts out a new range of stripped-down, affordable Melody Maker guitars and we stick them on the cover, even though they fall below the standards we’ve come to expect from that brand in recent years.

Meanwhile, here in the UK for the past 36 years, John Smith and a tiny team have offered similar styling (and a lot more besides), always with superb customer service and even better value for money.

“The ‘bucker sounds are right in that classic, timeless rock genre: nice bite and openness to the bridge unit; darker with more fluidity from the neck.”

Production numbers are relatively small but steady, with a very sensibly priced list of options and upgrates. As this fine, simplistic electric illustrates, then, Gordon-Smith can show Gibson a thing or two.

Gordon-Smith Guitars (GSG) doesn’t promote boutique-style quality, yet the honest blue-collar build is more than adequate to get the job done.

A thin (approx 35mm, just like the Melody Maker) two-piece, uncontoured Brazilian cedar body is tidily fixed to a quite-wide-at-the-nut, slickly playing cedar neck with a shallow-feeling ‘C’-shaped profile: 20mm deep at the first fret; 23.5mm at the 12th.

Medium jumbo frets are neatly installed, edges nicely domed and tops mirror polished. Inlays are simple pearloid dots on the conical radius rosewood slab fingerboard that’s not deeply coloured, but is more than fit for purpose.

That said, it does sport a rather tricky-to-adjust truss rod that’s accessible under a small plate at the end of the neck. The finish is thin natural satin and is cleanly done.

The hardware is similarly basic: a simple wrapover bridge with only overall intonation adjustment, and smooth-geared Van Gent tuners. But then things get a little bit tricky.

We have an unusual brass nut that’s height adjustable; proprietary GSG humbuckers; tone controls that are effectively bypassed at the top of their travel; and different valve capacitors as you pull up the volumes to split the humbuckers voicing the screw coils. Finally the output jack is side-mounted on a metal plate.

Sounds

Slightly neck-heavy strapped on, the overall light weight makes that easy to handle. There’s a lively acoustic ring and amp’d the output is hot vintage – we pulled the pickup heights down a little and preferred the slightly less in-your-face tonality and lower output.

Alongside a similarly constructed PRS Mira, the GS2 held its own nicely; there’s a little less body to the tone here on the higher strings – we’d certainly up the string gauge – but the ‘bucker sounds are right in that classic, timeless rock genre: nice bite and openness to the bridge unit; darker with more fluidity from the neck. Think Les Paul light.

Dial in a rawer amp tone and there’s a definite thrashier punky edge – especially with the tone controls full up – but clean things up and the neck would handle a jazz gig with ease. The bridge coil-split does sound a little thin but, mixed with the full or split neck pickup, there’s a very usable Fender-like edge and texture.

More gained metal tones are easily achieved from the bridge pickup but the guitar sounds most at home in those mid crunchy, frankly seventies Gibbo rock styles, yet still retains its own resonant, slightly lighter character.

A British hand-made guitar for a few pints of beer over £500? Stupid, but true. Throw in a list of options that none of the big boys offer and you have, on paper at least, the bargain of the century.

This GS2 60 would make a serious starter electric, spare, slide guitar or indeed a perfectly viable main guitar for any rock/blues player. It’s a fine chassis to modify too.

Yes, it is voiced on the bright side of the Gibson tone tracks, but it has such a lively resonance that it sounds musical and expressive with it.

So, buy your Gibsons and be ‘cool’ or buy one of these, hand-made by one of the UK’s most experienced guitar makers. Indulge in the paltry-cost options and know that you’ll have one of the finest new guitars you can buy.


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Humming in some 4-way switch positions

November 2nd, 2011

Quote:
  _____  

Originally Posted by sjtalon (Post 3681045)
This is how most Tele neck pups are and how to mod them, they have a jumper wire soldered to a cover tab (letter “C”) that goes to the negative coil lead:

http://www.guitar-mod.com/rg_4wayinfo.html

In order for the cover to act as a shield, it has to be grounded. I don’t know what the R Ellis’ look like to tell you how to go about it ?
  _____  

Ah, now I get it. From the link above:

“The reason for the added noise in 1 position is due to the fact that the ground wire on the neck pickup must be “lifted” away from ground and soldered to one of the lugs on the 4 way switch (henceforth I will refer to this as a “ground lift”). In a nutshell, when the bridge pickup is engaged alone (in position1) your neck pickup isn’t grounded because of the ground lift, so you may experience some extra noise.”

So I actually wasn’t following Rob’s diagram. It clearly shows the third wire for grounding the pickup cover which I don’t have:oops:

Here is another thread on the subject:


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Seymour Duncan APH-1N Alnico II Pro Humbucker Neck – Fantastic neck pickup!

November 2nd, 2011

http://img.audiofanzine.com/image.php?lang=en&identifier=id&size=thumb1&module=product&product_id=18504

Firstly, some specs I was able to dig up: Impedence – Neck: 7.6 k Bridge: 7.85 k Resonant peak – Neck: 7.1 KHz Bridge: 6.7 KHz Magnet type – Alnico II Bar EQ – Bass, Mid, Treble 7 / 4 / 8 Great for studio and live use, the Seymour Duncan Alnico II Pro (APH-1) is a fantastic pickup. It has the silky smoothness of an old Gibson PAF pickup, with crisp clarity, and a warmth you could practically build a fire around. I’ve owned a few of these pickups, and I’ve used them in the neck position of a couple of Gibson Les Paul guitars, as well as the neck position of a Fender Telecaster. In both guitars, the pickup allowed the guitar’s own characteristics to shine through, yet still imparted the tone with a wonderful singing “woman” tone, ala old Clapton, or Slash from Guns ‘n’ Roses. If you read my review on the Duncan Seth Lover pickups, this pickup offers similar tones, albeit a touch more modern and open sounding, and it is noticeably less expensive. I love both pickups for different applications, but this Alnico II Pro certainly gets the job done for classic rock, 50′s rock ‘n’ roll type stuff, rockabilly, country (especially fingerpicked Chet Atkins style), blues, and jazz. My favorite use is just jamming on a thick, overdriven Marshall, cranked up. This pickup excels at that type of use, and will provide all the creamy goodness you can handle. A bend, vibratoed note can sustain forever it seems, and the resulting tone will cause anyone, even lay-persons to take notice! I’ve had so many compliments on the guitar’s tone if I play my Les Paul at a show. I highly recommend the Alnico II Pro for blues and classic rock tones especially, but as a generally versatile pickup, this one is a great choice as well.


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Bridge humbucker in 72 Tele custom

October 31st, 2011

I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that you simply have the wrong guitar for the job.

Typically, the Tele Custom as it was produced in the 70′s is best suited to making two incredible sounds. The neck pickup alone, and the middle position.

The original 70′s Custom had a very powerful, bright pickup in the neck position and a comparatively weak pickup in the bridge position. because of these qualities, you could play really great sounding solos and crunchy rhythms using the neck or middle switch positions. The bridge pickup alone however, sounded a weak by comparison.

The neck pickup in your re-issue guitar has a much lower output than the vintage original and it has a much more muffled tone to it. In short, it doesn’t do the things an original 70′s Tele Custom would do. If you have the chance to play an original, you’ll hear exactly what I’m talking about immediately.


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twisted tele pickup producing sizzling sound

October 30th, 2011

Quote:
  _____  

Originally Posted by megafiddle
Can you describe the noise better?

Is it a pitched noise, like hum? (I realize it’s not hum, that’s just an example)
Or is it unpitched, like the hissing of a radio tuned between stations?

Also, when turning the volume control from 0 to 10, at what control position
is the noise maximum?
  _____  

Sizzle is the best way to describe it. Not hum. Definitely unpitched and only when the neck pickup is engaged – i.e. loudest in position 3, then 2, then 4.

Loudest when tone and volume are wide open. Can dial it out by rolling either down to 8 or so.


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Simple modifications of a TelePartsCaster body

October 30th, 2011

Hi again!

I did a simple sound recording for some Norwegian friends, and decided to share it on this forum as well. I am very inexperienced when it comes to recording, and after a microphone recording of the Fender Super Champ XD went bad (I can blame the cheap microphone and lack of experience in miking of guitar amps), it was back to my “when all else fails” solution, a VOX Amplug Classic Rock. It does not provide the proper Fender clean sound, but works better for recording than my microphone attempt. I’ve added a little reverb afterwards, but no other modification of the audio clip.

Try to listen past the bad timing and finger trouble. Here’s an attempt on the same phrase five times, once for each of the following pickup configurations:

SC neck pickup
SC SC bridge + neck pickup
SC bridge pickup
P-90
P-90 + SC = bridge pickup humbucker mode


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Seymour Duncan LW-MUST Dave Mustaine Model – Like an active set of the JB/Jazz combination

October 30th, 2011

http://img.audiofanzine.com/image.php?lang=en&identifier=id&size=thumb1&module=product&product_id=41139

Dave Mustaine has been using Duncans for a while. Mustaine is the founder of the popular thrash band Megadeth. He was using the JB/Jazz setup right before switching to these. These pickups came out long before the Blackouts and for a while they were the only active Seymour Duncan pickups available. They did not really look to take the place of the iconic EMG pickups. They didnt look like EMG’s and they were not marketed to EMG users. These pickups were more marketed to classic Seymour Duncan users and I think thats why these pickups never really caught on. These pickups did not really catch on and become popular. I think classic Seymour Duncan users didnt have a problem with the passive pickups so they did not bother with these more expensive active versions. These pickups retain the basic feel and quality of the JB/Jazz setup and adds a clarity and high gain composure to the sound. The bridge pickup is like a JB with more bite. It cuts even better than the passive JB does. The pickups are super clear and everything you play will come out, the good and the bad. The neck pickup is like a Jazz with a similar treatment. The Jazz was already a clear sounding pickup and now it has even more clarity. You can get a lot of different lead tones from the neck position by using the tone and volume control. If you are a big fan of the classic JB/Jazz setup but the passive set isnt quite cutting it for the type of music you are playing. The Dave Mustaine Livewires may be the set of pickups you are looking for. They have the JB/Jazz DNA with active clarity that will keep your sound cutting through no matter how much gain you are running.


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Wiring Help

October 30th, 2011

Mods, I’m not sure if this is the right place for this sorry if it isn’t!
Ok, so I’m wiring my first guitar and I have some questions.
The guitar is an Ibanez gax that I filled in the neck pickup cavity ala Jr. So it has a single humbucker with a Vol/Tone in the bridge position. I am planning on putting a GFS Crunch Pat in there.
1st: What capacitor value should I use?

2nd: Does anyone have a wiring diagram for a push pull pot on the volume pot. With the knob pushed down just the typical Vol/Tone configuration. But with the knob pulled up the pickup wired straight to the jack?

I don’t know whether this is possible or not. Also if I didn’t make myself clear I’m sorry lol.


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Tele/Esquire “”conversion”" question

October 28th, 2011

There was someone on here who did an Esquire with a neck pickup only.

Might do that myself someday

But it would have to be a P90

Most of my Teles have been Esquires at some point.

But most have gone back to Teles

To me an Esquire has got to be wired (and controlled) like these guys

TwoMMsOutside1 Tele/Esquire conversion question

Pickup+2 very responsive controls


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Combination of low-output neck pickup and high-output bridge pickup

October 28th, 2011

I know one thing for sure.You may not be considering both pickups at once but, that is where one of the best tones will be. (In my opinion)
I have a Tele with a stock bridge single coil and a Gibson style humbucker in the neck. Balancing the out put is achieved by adjusting the pickup height… as mentioned.
I love this combination for the same reasons that you have mentioned. Mellow Jazz to biting Twang all in one guitar.

As you are from Korea, I have to mention that we have just started watching http://www.kimchichronicles.tv/ a new series presented on public television here.
We have watched 3 episodes and love everything that we are seeing. The traditional cuisine looks fantastic.

Welcome to the TDPRI


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Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Set Blackouts – Puuuuur

October 28th, 2011

http://img.audiofanzine.com/image.php?lang=en&identifier=id&size=thumb1&module=product&product_id=75277

I used recently to replace a pair of EMG 81/85 ESP a Ninja. Although the EMG 85 stands up very well in the neck position for clean leads and parts were missing a little personality. The 81 I can not hear about is the microphone that sounds too typical and not transparent par excellence. Not enough fishing, not so clean as this, a little bland and synthetic. In short, I was tired and wanted to stay in the asset (for cleanliness). I was looking for a set of microphones that had a lot of fishing for rock / metal (up to extreme styles) while enjoying a clean efficient. So, having invested in a Blackout AHB-1 some time ago for a 7-String Squier and being very happy with the sound, I decided to ask a set AHB-1 on my ESP. And indeed, not disappointed at all! It’s very clean, no background noise (in addition to my pedal to the test I went live on the amp). Toc to gain! I went from 7.5 in EMG Fireball 5 on my 100W. Duncan Announces 6/5/9 in Bass / Mid / Treble for AHB-1. And indeed, with the EQ of the amp at noon the sound is already correct! Refining according to my preferences I found his monumental. Feel free to adjust the height of good microphones, they are very sensitive to their position and there is no need to make them flush with the strings for gain galore … The neck pickup is a sadistic executor, a real butcher! Harmonics which fuse easily, as the big big love! It is clear, it’s powerful, it’s clean and it is especially super dynamic! Her boyfriend is very good round and give you clean jazzy sounds great. Coupled with a little slapback delay in, you can have a nice little sound to the old. Funky! For lead, it is a pleasure. It has a sacred character and is rich in media. You will be leaving the mix without worry! It is warm and full of fish at a time. In summary, the AHB-1 are the assets of Duncan the most effective styles of modern metal! There is still the AHB-2 Metal, the signature emty Mike Thompson of Slipknot and Dave Mustaine LiveWire (which I’m very interested as well). For those who are tired of EMG, go ahead. For those who want active daring adventure, go for it too! You will not be disappointed!


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Using a Rat2 properly

October 25th, 2011

Quote:
  _____  

Originally Posted by looney77 (Post 3664844)
I would say the guitar tone knob. I like the filter set high on a rat. I like going for a “woman” kinda tone with the filter set high, guitar tone knob rolled down low from the neck pickup. Of course, this is with humbuggies. But I dig it.
  _____  

This is kind of cool trick with almost any dirt pedal with a lot of Gain- the key to make that “woman tone” take off is cranking the Tone control on Pedal X and turning it off on the guitar…I do this with a Blues Driver or GFS Brownie (Rat clone) and I use a Strat and a Tele ( using neck pickup for the fuzzzzzy)


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Tokai ulc53 (tone/ pickup problem?)

October 24th, 2011

Posted by metalhead3386 in Ask The Pros – Hey guys, i recently purchased a Tokai les paul custom, as at £200 it was a bargin down from £399 and a LOT cheaper than a Gibson les paul custom!! anyways, got the guitar and it is amazing, the play and feel of it is outstanding, the build quality is excelent, only one problem, after a while of playing, the neck pickup became real muddy, like constant “woman” tone! and when i turn the tone around it hardly does anything! also there seamed to be drop out of clarity and volume, so i fiddled with the tone and volume knobs and there is like a breakup/ hissing sound when i play, the bridge pickup is fine (very crisp and tight yet with character and slight warmth) but it seams something has gone wrong with the neck ppup, occasionally its tone and character comes back but the tone hardly does anything and i feel its alot muddier and dark than it should be…. any ideas?


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Don Mare or Antiquity II ???

October 24th, 2011

Quote:
  _____  

Originally Posted by punch (Post 3661778)
Well, I want the bridge to have bite, twang, honk, wood and the neck should NOT sound like a strat, but like the somewhat muffled flute-like tone of a good telecaster neck pickup!
  _____  

sounds like your after a 50 to 53 era neck
Alnico 3 with brass cover with chrome plating “muffled flute-like tone ”


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CV50′s with stealth P-90

October 23rd, 2011

It’s gotta sound great. It’s like listening to music in the next room with the door closed. icon lol CV50s with stealth P 90

Is that fair for me to say not having ever tried one? No, but somehow I wanted to say it anyway. Maybe it is a reaction to the hype in the ad. It’s a CV Tele with the opening bid selling used for what they sell them new with one of the usual discount promotions at GC. It’s been worked over using God knows what technology, and he wants over 500 clams for it, and bidding starting at $295 as described above.

Modded up guitars rarely sell for what you have in them. Wouldn’t it be a kicker if the whole Afghanistan story was fiction too? I know it is harsh for me to say that, but the whole listing is hype.

And then they did a relic job on it. Relic’ing a CV50??? icon redface CV50s with stealth P 90 I love CV50′s but it is not what I think of in the same sentence as the word vintage. And if it isn’t a relic, then it is a really badly beat up guitar. All the more angst. Notice it is now offered at the above prices which are lower then when he couldn’t sell it before. Any bidders if he started it at $99 bucks? I’m not sure. Hey it’s my day off so I get to say whatever I want. icon smile CV50s with stealth P 90 It is how I feel though. Just my opinion. You know what they say, there is a lid for every pot, and in the car industry they say there is an ass for every seat. Can we think up a new one for guitars? C’mon creative geniuses, I’m all ears. icon cool CV50s with stealth P 90

PS: P90′s in Teles do sound good, but not by taking the neck pickup out, but rather by adding the P90 in the middle as a third option. Just my opinion. Ok it’s time to get out the popcorn. icon lol CV50s with stealth P 90 icon eek CV50s with stealth P 90

Sorry if I offended anyone. Just having fun.


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Gibson SG Standard Ebony

October 23rd, 2011

http://img.audiofanzine.com/image.php?lang=en&identifier=id&size=thumb1&module=product&product_id=66830

Nashville (Usa) Made, Mahogany body Ebony Black Gibson SG standard, 2 volume, 2 tone controls, center, 300k Linear Volume, 500k Non-linear Tonebridge. Center, bridge and neck pickup selector, the pickups are alnico made 498T in the bridge and 490R in the neck, Gibson updated rendition of the original PAF humbuckers of the late 50′s early 60′s. Rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets, with chrome stop bar, pickups and tune O-Matic. Nickel vintage tuners with perloid buttons. Comes with a black Gibson hardshell case.


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Ibanez [RG Prestige] RG2610Z – Black – Old school 1 pickup guitar

October 23rd, 2011

http://img.audiofanzine.com/image.php?lang=en&identifier=id&size=thumb1&module=product&product_id=100703

For all you EVH lovers or people who just hate the neck pickup in general, Ibanez has FINALLY made a guitar for you. For all these years, they made guitars with either two or three pickups, but these one pickup guitars seem to be selling quite well in the store. Hopefully Ibanez will continue to take the hint that there’s a demand for these… The guitar features a basswood body, a maple neck with a rosewood fretboard, 24 extra jumbo frets with ghost shark fin inlays, an Edge Zero tremolo, one humbucker configuration and one tone.


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4 way switch VS neck humbucker

October 22nd, 2011

Quote:
  _____  

Originally Posted by mrsongbird (Post 3656330)
I just put a 4 way in a CS Nocaster after loving the sound out of a Baja. Bear in mind, I’ve never played a tele with a neck humbucker, but I have played a ton of LPs, and when I’m on one of those, I spend most of my time on the bridge alone.

I can’t seem to make a neck humbucker work for more than just lead lines or super, super clean. If there’s any hair at all, it’s just mud city to my ears.

Conversely, when I play a telecaster (which is most of the time), I play the neck quite a bit. It’s one of my favorite sounds in the world.

When I put the 4-way in, I felt like I was getting all the best parts of the neck humbucker with increased snap and clarity. The sacrifice of losing that single coil neck pickup is much too great for me.

I use the series position sparingly, but it’s very nice to have. I think using the tone knob in conjunction with the series is going to get you the best parts of the neck humbucker, but that’s just me!
  _____  

I think this may be down to the type of humbucker, you need one that suits a tele and matches up with the bridge unit. I fitted a G&B split-pole full size alnico humbucker “about 8k” – this is a “vintage” wind. Looks like a WR but is actually a PAF. This is no hot humbucker, yet with a 250k vol it has to be a little higher than it should be, which gives it more spit – rather like a tele neck single-coil, only more-so. Smooth cool jazz, but can get ballsy.

Normally a humbucker raised this high would drown the bridge unit, it did. So I fitted a Barden there – sorted.


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